Rush Jobs & Principles [A Designer’s Tale]

Daniel Montiero | Unsplash

I recently got asked to quote for a brand identity job, which included several other things initially — including a character illustration with multiple poses.

I found out what was needed and I quoted. I didn’t get the job because someone said they could turnaround a logo and brand guidelines in 3 days.

3 days.

Photo by Kelly Sikkema | Unsplash [silly edits by me]

I could pull a logo out of the woodwork in 3 days. No bother.

It’d be a rush job, a logo that wouldn’t stand the test of time and I wouldn’t be proud of what I’d done, I remembered when I used to allow deadlines that were unachievable and quotes that weren’t reflective of the work I did and I began to feel a slight tinge of pride.

There’s no one formula, or one size fits all approach.

Over the 4 years I’ve been freelancing I’ve experienced the worst and the best kind of client, apathy, excitement, down days, up days, dry patches, fear, anxiety, re-employment, resignation and a heck of a lot of life coaching and have learned that there’s no one formula, or one size fits all approach.

Image by Carson Arias | Unsplash [edit by me]

My objectives after everything I’ve learned in this position are to work with people invested in their brand, they’ll have a deep understanding of who they are, and the story they want to tell. We’ll work on a collaborative basis, to find out the reasons for their existence and I’ll express that in illustrative form.

That all sounds a bit hippy, right?

The psychology of a brand and the humans within that need to be considered heavily when formulating a visual identity *puts on tie die shirt*.

Which is why things like Fiverrrrrrrr don’t float my boat, anyone can create a logo right? Of course, but without thought for the ‘why’, what’s the point.


Hello, I’m Nik, I specialise in Marketing & Brand Design for start-ups and small businesses. I also enjoy writing about authenticity, emotional + experience based thoughts and positive outcomes.